Reynolds Libraries offer extended hours during exam weeks: Fall 2019

extended-hoursTo help Reynolds students prepare for final exams,  Reynolds Libraries will extend its hours of operation during the last weeks of the semester at the Parham and Downtown campuses.

Extended Hours Schedule:

7:45 am – 10:00 pm          Monday, Dec. 2nd – Thursday, Dec. 5th

7:45 am – 5:00 pm            Friday, Dec, 6th

8:00 am – 2:00 pm            Saturday, Dec. 7th (Downtown Library only)

10:00 am – 4: 00 pm         Saturday, Dec. 7th, (Parham Library only)

7:45 am – 10:00 pm          Monday, Dec. 9th – Thursday, Dec. 12th

7:45 am – 5:00 pm            Friday, Dec. 13rd

We hope the extended hours will provide you a safe and comfortable learning environment and to offer you the research assistance you need for your final exams and papers.

Good luck!

APA Style Changes – Highlights from the new 7th Edition

apa-7th-ed

The 7th edition of APA’s Publication Manual is now available. As stated on the APA Style blog, “The transition to seventh edition APA Style will not happen overnight. Although the new Publication Manual was released in October 2019, we anticipate that most students and professionals will start using seventh edition style in the spring semester of 2020 or thereafter.” Reynolds Libraries will update its Citation Style: APA LibGuide by the early part of next year. Below are some highlights of the new changes:

 Formatting changes:

  • New guidelines for formatting student papers
  • More options for choosing a font size and style (other than Times New Roman 12) as long as the fonts are legible and widely available
  • One space after sentence period
  • More quotations will be used rather than italicizing words
  • In-text citations – if a source was written by 3 or more authors, you can use et al.

More Citation examples:

  • The new manual includes more citation examples that include classroom material, Intranet sources, and social media such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

eBooks and articles database:

  • Continue to use the DOI # for journal articles that include a DOI #.
  • Journal articles without a DOI # including eBooks, magazine and newspaper articles found in a database should be treated as print works. Do not list the database name or the URL of the publisher’s home page. Only include database information in the reference if the source comes from a database that publishes original, proprietary content, such as UpToDate. For an explanation of this change, click here.

Hyperlinks/URLs:

  • Present both DOIs and URLs as hyperlinks (i.e., beginning with “http:” or “https:” –  https://doi.org/10.1037/ppm0000185).
  • Because a hyperlink leads readers directly to the content, it is no longer necessary to include the words “Retrieved from” or “Accessed from” before a DOI or URL.
  • It is acceptable to use either the default display settings for hyperlinks in your word-processing program (e.g., usually blue font, underlined) or plain text that is not underlined.
  • Leave links live if the work is to be published or read online.

Publisher information:

  • Publisher location is no longer necessary (same as MLA guidelines)

Help Tools:

  • Reynolds Libraries will be ordering the 7th edition of the APA Publication Manual which will be made available at each campus library.
  • APA is planning to develop a tutorial on the 7th edition changes which should be made available sometime in 2020.
  • The APA Style website has been recently updated to include the 7th edition changes – https://apastyle.apa.org/. Check out the information under “Style and Grammar Guidelines” and “Instructional Aids.”
  • APA style questions can be sent via email to StyleExpert@apa.org
  • The Concise Guide to APA Style for Students will be available in December 2019. “This easy-to-use pocket guide is adapted from the seventh edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and is designed specifically for undergraduate writing.”

1969, the year that was

The Downtown Campus Library is commemorating 1969, 5 decades ago.

Parham Campus Library put up a 1969 display this summer, and the Downtown Campus is finally putting up a display before the year is over. We are also using the beautiful graphic that KC from PRC Library created. It is amazing how some things have changed based on actions taken in 1969 and how other things have not changed at all. Below are some examples.

Most of the examples below and in the display were taken from Wikipedia and these sites:
https://www.thoughtco.com/african-american-history-timeline-1965-1969-45444
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_African-American_history
https://timelines.ws/20thcent/1969.HTML

January 2, The play “To be Young, Gifted & Black,” by Lorraine Hansberry (1930-1965) premiered in NYC.

February 24, The US Supreme Court in the Tinker vs. Des Moines School District case ruled that students had the right to express opinions at odds with the government.

March 25, John and Yoko Ono staged a bed-in for peace in Amsterdam.

May 25, “Midnight Cowboy” was released with an X rating and became the only X-rated film to win an Oscar.

June 3, The last episode of Star Trek aired on NBC (Turnabout Intruder).

June 22, In Cleveland the Cuyahoga River became heavily affected by industrial pollution, so much so that it “caught fire” at least 13 times, most famously on June 22, 1969, when it helped spur the American environmental movement with the Clean Water Act and the Environmental Protection Agency.

June 28, In the early hours 8 police officers raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York City’s Greenwich Village. Police raided the bar because it had refused to pay an increase in bribery. This led to a clash in what came to be called The Stonewall Rebellion, an incident considered the birth of the gay rights movement. Some 400 to 1,000 patrons rioted against police for 3 days.

July 11, David Bowie (b.1947), British musician, released his single “Space Oddity,” supposedly in conjunction with the July 20 Apollo 11 moon landing.

July 18, A car driven by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (1932-2009), D-Mass., plunged off a bridge on Chappaquiddick Island near Martha’s Vineyard. His passenger, 28-year-old Mary Jo Kopechne, died. Kennedy did not report the accident until it was discovered 9 hours later.

July 20, Astronaut Neil Armstrong took his legendary “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” He and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin made the first successful landing of a manned vehicle on the moon’s Sea of Tranquility when they touched down in Apollo 11.

July 25, A week after the Chappaquiddick accident that claimed the life of Mary Jo Kopechne, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy pleaded guilty to a charge of leaving the scene of an accident.

August 15, Guitarist Jimi Hendrix headlines the Woodstock Music Festival in upstate New York.

August 17, Hurricane Camille hit the Gulf Coast at Pass Christian, MS., leaving 256 people killed in Louisiana and Mississippi. A widespread area of western and central Virginia received over 8 inches of rain from Camille’s remains, leading to significant flooding across the state. A total of 153 people lost their lives from blunt trauma sustained during mountain slides, related to the flash flooding, not drowning. More than 123 of these deaths, including 21 members of one family, the Huffmans, were in Nelson County where the number of deaths amounted to over one percent of the county’s population. Hurricane Camille caused more than $140 million of damage (1969 dollars) in Virginia. The book, Roar of the Heavens, available for checkout.

November 10, Sesame Street, a children’s show, premiered on the National Education Television network (NET), which later became PBS.

November 13, Speaking in Des Moines, Iowa, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew accused network television news departments of bias and distortion, and urged viewers to lodge complaints.

November 20, A group of 80 Native Americans, all college students, seized Alcatraz Island in the name of “Indians of All Tribes.” The occupation lasted 19 months. They offered $24 in beads and cloth to buy the island, demanded an American Indian Univ., museum and cultural center, and listed reasons why the island was a suitable Indian reservation.

December 4, Fred Hampton, chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party, was shot and killed while asleep in bed during a police raid on his home.

December 14, The Jackson 5 appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show. Michael Jackson was 11.

December 18, Britain’s Parliament abolished the death penalty for murder.

In 1969, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross (d.2004) wrote “On Death and Dying.” The book helped to launch the hospice movement in the US.

In 1969, Marvel Comics introduced Falcon, the first African-American superhero, in an issue of its Captain America comics.

Haze of Hot Dogs @ Library Open House

James Satchell grilled hot dogs for students outside of the Goochland Library using a grill made by Jason Berry, Reynolds student.


Heat, Haze & Hot Dogs…

In a haze of hot dogs, over 300 students, faculty & staff from Reynolds Community College attended the 2019 Library Tailgate Open House events at all three campuses. While they were there, 70+ students made the “Trek to Tutoring” to discover this valuable student support service at both Downtown & Parham campuses. Aside from dining on hot dogs, guests were also invited to download apps for Overdrive, Flipster, Brainfuse & Canvas. Instrumental guitarist Jackson Wright provided cool vibes to entertain us too!

One of the highlights for the Goochland Campus Tailgate was the use of an ornamental grill made by Reynolds student Jason Berry in Michael Vaughan’s Welding 155/Ornamental Welding class.

The best part was seeing YOU, our students, faculty & staff.
Thanks for stopping by!

P.S. Take a peek at the botanical designs displayed by David Pippin’s HRT 268/Advanced Floral Design class here:
https://flic.kr/s/aHsmHgQRvq





Chronicle of Higher Education – Access it from anywhere

Did you know Reynolds Libraries has an online subscription to The Chronicle of Higher Education? “The Chronicle is the No. 1 source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty members and administrators . . . the Chronicle is published every weekday and features the complete contents of the latest issue; daily news and advice columns; thousands of current job listings; an archive of previously published content; vibrant discussion forums; and career-building tools such as online CV management, salary databases, and more.”

You can access the library’s subscription to the Chronicle from this blog or access the Chronicle from Reynolds Libraries web site by following these steps:

  1. Go to the library’s home page located at http://library.reynolds.edu.
  2. From the Research menu, click on Databases.
  3. When the A-Z Databases list appears, click on the C tab from the alphabetical list of tabs located near the top of the list.
  4. When the list of databases that begin with C appears, scroll down and click on the Chronicle of Higher Education link.

Off-Campus: If you access the Chronicle from this blog or from the library’s web site from off campus, you will be prompted with a Virginia’s Community Colleges login screen first. Login with your My Reynolds username and password.

You can also create your own personal Chronicle of Higher Education and Chronicle Vitae accounts to take advantage of the following services:

  • receive e-newsletters on a variety of academic topics.
  • participate in forums with colleagues and expert.
  • comment on Chronicle news, commentary, review, and advice pieces.
  • create an unlimited number of job alerts so that anytime a job is posted that meets your criteria, you are alerted by e-mail.

If you need any assistance with accessing The Chronicle of Higher Education from on or off campus or setting up a personal account, ask any Reynolds Librarian.

Reynolds Libraries Promote A Healthy Mind and Body

Bike

Students at Reynolds Libraries are taking a holistic approach to their studies. Not only do they exercise their minds with the many resources the library has to offer, they exercise their bodies using the FitDesk stationary bike, found at both the Goochland and Parham Road locations.

Regular exercise not only enhances brain health, but working out before or after a study session awakens your mind and helps you retain information longer, potentially giving your test scores a welcome boost, according to the Scientific American.

So what are you waiting for? It’s science, ya’ll. 

Updated Library Website is live!

newsite

We are excited to officially launch our updated website! After receiving feedback from students, faculty, and staff, the library site was updated to create a better user experience.

The new site makes navigating easier by having a persistent menu bar with all library links available no matter where you are on the site:

megamenu

We’ve also incorporated a prominent search box area that allows you to customize your catalog search based on what type of resource you are seeking – including Textbook Reserves. Additionally, you can now easily browse Popular/Best sellers, DVDs, and recently added books to the collection:

searchbox

Library Workshops and Events are now prominently listed on the new library homepage as well as the most recent social media posts:

workshops-gif

Some more exciting things to look forward to in the near future: more video guides/tutorials and an improved look for our Research Guides that will integrate more seamlessly with the rest of the website.

Please be aware that if you had previously bookmarked any links to specific library pages, you will need to update those to reflect the new URLs.  Otherwise, you may receive a “404” error page. If you have any trouble finding a particular resource, have questions, or would like to provide any additional feedback, don’t hesitate to reach us by phone, email, or in person.