Juneteenth

File:Emancipation Day celebration - 1900-06-19.jpg
Juneteenth Emancipation Day Celebration, June 19, 1900, Texas by Mrs. Charles Stephenson (Grace Murray) from The Portal to Texas History Austin History Center, Austin Public Library. This media file is in the public domain in the United States.

On June 19th, 1865, in Galveston, Texas Union Major General Gordon Granger read General Order Number Three to an assembled group of people stating that all slaves were free. This was the news that resulted from Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation from Jan. 1, 1863 as it finally reached all states, and Texas became the very last state to hear of the news.  Within the black community, this announcement sparked an immediate celebration, and was again celebrated the following year. Years later at Booker T. Washington Park in Limestone, Texas the celebrations drew thousands of people in commemoration of this freedom. Black families gathered together that day to commemorate their final notification that slavery had officially ended.

As a result the date of June 19th was known as the blended word, Juneteenth, and celebrations spread throughout Texas and neighboring states. In the 19th century, festivities included the reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, slave stories, prayer, speeches, rodeos, dances, games and lots of food. As populations spread from the southern United States to more urban areas the celebrations continued.  In the 1970’s the popularity of Juneteenth was resurfacing in Texas, and in 1980 it became a state holiday. Celebrations now include many festivities in many states as a celebration of freedom from slavery.

“Juneteenth.” Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition, Feb. 2020, p. 1. EBSCOhost, ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=134522961&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Prather, Patricia Smith. “Juneteenth.” Cobblestone, vol. 18, no. 3, Mar. 1997, p. 17. EBSCOhost, ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=9704025456&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Wynn, Linda T. “Juneteenth.” Freedom Facts & Firsts: 400 Years of the African American Civil Rights Experience, Jan. 2009, p. 26. EBSCOhost, ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=40073964&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Gay Pride Month 2020

“The spirit that emerged outside a Mafia-run bar in 1969 became the pulse of the gay community and inspired not just an annual parade but ways to express gay pride in individual lives.
Stonewall happens every day.”

― Ann Bausum, Stonewall: Breaking Out in the Fight for Gay Rights

June is Gay Pride Month, and this year celebrates the impetus of the Pride movement, the Stonewall Riots of 1969. In recent years, we have witnessed laws passed ensuring marriage and workplace equality for the LGBTQ+ community. These rights were won through years of protest and legal battles – the will to fight for all of these hard-won rights began at the popular NYC hangout The Stonewall bar, which was also the epicenter of the Manhattan Gay and Lesbian community.

The New York City Police department would regularly raid the bar, arresting, or in some cases, brutally assaulting many of the customers. On June 28th 1969, the patrons of the Stonewall decided to fight back, inciting a riot when NYC Police attempted yet another raid. This time the police were met with stiff resistance, and from this uprising was born the Pride Movement, which has been fighting for equality ever since.

To read about the Stonewall Riots, and other stories about early champions of the Gay Rights Movement, start with the resources listed below. When performing your own search, make sure to utilize the filtering menus in the library catalog and library databases. If you need help with your search, don’t hesitate to visit a librarian on the Zoom Library Space at this link between 8AM to 4PM Monday through Friday: https://vccs.zoom.us/j/383422033  – If prompted for a meeting ID, please enter 383-422-033

Helpful search terms for your research: Gay Pride, LGBTQ+, Stonewall Riots, Marriage Equality

Electronic Resources

The Wedding Heard ‘Round the World: America’s First Gay Marriage by Michael McConnell, Jack Baker, and Gail Langer Karwoski – 2016

https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.ezproxy.vccs.edu:2443/lib/jsrcc/detail.action?docID=4391858

Law and the Gay Rights Story: The Long Search for Equal Justice in a Divided Democracy by Walter Frank – 2014

https://vcc-srl-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/1r9mc31/01VCC_NETWORK_ALMA5158073000004386

VIDEO

After Stonewall: America’s LGBT Movement – 1977

https://vcc-srl-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/anvtfj/01VCC_NETWORK_ALMA5166190510004386

BOOKS

The Stonewall Riots by Laurie Collier Hillstrom – 2016

Available in the Parham Circulating Collection

https://vcc-srl-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/1r9mc31/01VCC_NETWORK_ALMA990025418490204393

The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle by Lillian Faderman

Available in the Parham circulating collection

https://vcc-srl-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/1r9mc31/01VCC_NETWORK_ALMA990023015640204393

Stand By Me: The Forgotten History of Gay Liberation by Jim Downs

Available in the Downtown circulating collection

https://vcc-srl-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/1r9mc31/01VCC_NETWORK_ALMA990023532550204393

June: Loving v. Virginia

In June of 1967, the Lovings won a landmark civil liberties case against the Commonwealth of Virginia’s interracial marriage laws and were the first of many couples to celebrate the downfall of Anti-miscegenation Laws that were in effect across the Southern states. June 12th is the day that we celebrate the accomplishment of one couple in the face of a tyrannical law that opened the gates for a multitude of couples across these United States.

Mildred and Richard Loving

Calhan, Greger. “A Loving Reality for All.” American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU, 14 June 2013, https://www.aclu.org/blog/lgbt-rights/lgbt-relationships/loving-reality-all.

Carrington, Adam M. “Free and Happy Bonds: Loving V. Virginia’s Nineteenth-Century Precedent on Marriage and the Pursuit of Happiness.” Perspectives on Political Science, vol. 45, no. 2, Routledge, 2016, pp. 87–96, doi:10.1080/10457097.2015.1111733.

Gordon-Reed, Annette. Race on Trial : Law and Justice in American History. Oxford University Press, 2002.

Infobase, film distributor, and MacNeil/Lehrer Productions. Mildred Loving and Interracial Marriage. MacNeil/Lehrer Productions, 2008.

YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-qlS_J4Mho&feature=youtu.be. Accessed 27 May 2020.

Black History Month

This month the DTC Library put up a display on Black History Month based entirely on Google’s site that shows the most searched people in the past 15 years.

In honor of Black History Month, Google is celebrating the icons and moments that have been searched more than any others in the United States.

All the images and write-ups about the most searched people were found on this Google site. The books are available for checkout at all campus libraries. Enjoy the video below.

New business & technology database – O’Reilly for Higher Education

Check out our new business & technology database, O’Reilly for Higher Education. This digital collection which replaces the Safari eBooks database, includes more than 38,000 book titles and more than 30,000 hours of video. Topics range from programming to IT networking to project management to graphic design to business strategy to career development. The O’Reilly database provides unlimited access to any resource in its collection. When accessing this database from both on & off campus, you will be prompted to login with your My Reynolds username & password.

The O’Reilly for Higher Education database content includes:

  • eBooks
  • audio books
  • training videos & interactive tutorials
  • case studies
  • code snippets
  • certification preparation materials
  • practice exercises
  • And much more

**An important note for instructors that may have assigned specific titles in the Safari eBook database in past semesters, please be aware that eBook titles once available in the Safari database may not be available in the new O’Reilly database.

To familiarize yourself with the O’Reilly database, check out this helpful user guide or YouTube video. Once logged into the O’Reilly database, you can also check out their Support Center website.

For instructors that are interested in linking to specific O’Reilly resources in their Canvas courses, check out this page.

Changes to Kanopy Video Streaming

Beginning 12/18/2019, the Kanopy video streaming resource now only allows unlimited streaming for the titles that the library has paid an annual license for.  The previous model of unlimited streaming for all titles was not financially sustainable. We are hopeful that the new model still allows easy access to the most highly demanded and requested films used by our faculty, staff, and students in support of the course curriculum.

When you access the Kanopy homepage, all the titles you see in the categories section are videos we currently have licensed and are instantly streamable. Simply click on the title you wish to stream and then click on the play button:

kanopy1

In addition, anyone can submit a purchase request for any title that we don’t currently have licensed.  Submitting a request does not guarantee that we can purchase the title; however, we will try and honor requests based on the needs of the requester and the current library budget.

Requesting a title is easy.  When you encounter a title we currently do not have licensed, fill out the form and click the “Request Access” button:

kanopy2

You will receive a submission confirmation via email. A librarian will follow up with you within 48 hours to update you with the status of your request.

Do not hesitate to Ask Us if you have any questions regarding Kanopy or if you encounter any issues with access and/or streaming.  We are happy that we can continue to provide access to this popular and useful resource!

Reynolds Libraries offer extended hours during exam weeks: Fall 2019

extended-hoursTo help Reynolds students prepare for final exams,  Reynolds Libraries will extend its hours of operation during the last weeks of the semester at the Parham and Downtown campuses.

Extended Hours Schedule:

7:45 am – 10:00 pm          Monday, Dec. 2nd – Thursday, Dec. 5th

7:45 am – 5:00 pm            Friday, Dec, 6th

8:00 am – 2:00 pm            Saturday, Dec. 7th (Downtown Library only)

10:00 am – 4: 00 pm         Saturday, Dec. 7th, (Parham Library only)

7:45 am – 10:00 pm          Monday, Dec. 9th – Thursday, Dec. 12th

7:45 am – 5:00 pm            Friday, Dec. 13rd

We hope the extended hours will provide you a safe and comfortable learning environment and to offer you the research assistance you need for your final exams and papers.

Good luck!

APA Style Changes – Highlights from the new 7th Edition

apa-7th-ed

The 7th edition of APA’s Publication Manual is now available. As stated on the APA Style blog, “The transition to seventh edition APA Style will not happen overnight. Although the new Publication Manual was released in October 2019, we anticipate that most students and professionals will start using seventh edition style in the spring semester of 2020 or thereafter.” Reynolds Libraries will update its Citation Style: APA LibGuide by the early part of next year. Below are some highlights of the new changes:

 Formatting changes:

  • New guidelines for formatting student papers
  • More options for choosing a font size and style (other than Times New Roman 12) as long as the fonts are legible and widely available
  • One space after sentence period
  • More quotations will be used rather than italicizing words
  • In-text citations – if a source was written by 3 or more authors, you can use et al.

More Citation examples:

  • The new manual includes more citation examples that include classroom material, Intranet sources, and social media such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

eBooks and articles database:

  • Continue to use the DOI # for journal articles that include a DOI #.
  • Journal articles without a DOI # including eBooks, magazine and newspaper articles found in a database should be treated as print works. Do not list the database name or the URL of the publisher’s home page. Only include database information in the reference if the source comes from a database that publishes original, proprietary content, such as UpToDate. For an explanation of this change, click here.

Hyperlinks/URLs:

  • Present both DOIs and URLs as hyperlinks (i.e., beginning with “http:” or “https:” –  https://doi.org/10.1037/ppm0000185).
  • Because a hyperlink leads readers directly to the content, it is no longer necessary to include the words “Retrieved from” or “Accessed from” before a DOI or URL.
  • It is acceptable to use either the default display settings for hyperlinks in your word-processing program (e.g., usually blue font, underlined) or plain text that is not underlined.
  • Leave links live if the work is to be published or read online.

Publisher information:

  • Publisher location is no longer necessary (same as MLA guidelines)

Help Tools:

  • Reynolds Libraries will be ordering the 7th edition of the APA Publication Manual which will be made available at each campus library.
  • APA is planning to develop a tutorial on the 7th edition changes which should be made available sometime in 2020.
  • The APA Style website has been recently updated to include the 7th edition changes – https://apastyle.apa.org/. Check out the information under “Style and Grammar Guidelines” and “Instructional Aids.”
  • APA style questions can be sent via email to StyleExpert@apa.org
  • The Concise Guide to APA Style for Students will be available in December 2019. “This easy-to-use pocket guide is adapted from the seventh edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and is designed specifically for undergraduate writing.”

1969, the year that was

The Downtown Campus Library is commemorating 1969, 5 decades ago.

Parham Campus Library put up a 1969 display this summer, and the Downtown Campus is finally putting up a display before the year is over. We are also using the beautiful graphic that KC from PRC Library created. It is amazing how some things have changed based on actions taken in 1969 and how other things have not changed at all. Below are some examples.

Most of the examples below and in the display were taken from Wikipedia and these sites:
https://www.thoughtco.com/african-american-history-timeline-1965-1969-45444
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_African-American_history
https://timelines.ws/20thcent/1969.HTML

January 2, The play “To be Young, Gifted & Black,” by Lorraine Hansberry (1930-1965) premiered in NYC.

February 24, The US Supreme Court in the Tinker vs. Des Moines School District case ruled that students had the right to express opinions at odds with the government.

March 25, John and Yoko Ono staged a bed-in for peace in Amsterdam.

May 25, “Midnight Cowboy” was released with an X rating and became the only X-rated film to win an Oscar.

June 3, The last episode of Star Trek aired on NBC (Turnabout Intruder).

June 22, In Cleveland the Cuyahoga River became heavily affected by industrial pollution, so much so that it “caught fire” at least 13 times, most famously on June 22, 1969, when it helped spur the American environmental movement with the Clean Water Act and the Environmental Protection Agency.

June 28, In the early hours 8 police officers raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York City’s Greenwich Village. Police raided the bar because it had refused to pay an increase in bribery. This led to a clash in what came to be called The Stonewall Rebellion, an incident considered the birth of the gay rights movement. Some 400 to 1,000 patrons rioted against police for 3 days.

July 11, David Bowie (b.1947), British musician, released his single “Space Oddity,” supposedly in conjunction with the July 20 Apollo 11 moon landing.

July 18, A car driven by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (1932-2009), D-Mass., plunged off a bridge on Chappaquiddick Island near Martha’s Vineyard. His passenger, 28-year-old Mary Jo Kopechne, died. Kennedy did not report the accident until it was discovered 9 hours later.

July 20, Astronaut Neil Armstrong took his legendary “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” He and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin made the first successful landing of a manned vehicle on the moon’s Sea of Tranquility when they touched down in Apollo 11.

July 25, A week after the Chappaquiddick accident that claimed the life of Mary Jo Kopechne, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy pleaded guilty to a charge of leaving the scene of an accident.

August 15, Guitarist Jimi Hendrix headlines the Woodstock Music Festival in upstate New York.

August 17, Hurricane Camille hit the Gulf Coast at Pass Christian, MS., leaving 256 people killed in Louisiana and Mississippi. A widespread area of western and central Virginia received over 8 inches of rain from Camille’s remains, leading to significant flooding across the state. A total of 153 people lost their lives from blunt trauma sustained during mountain slides, related to the flash flooding, not drowning. More than 123 of these deaths, including 21 members of one family, the Huffmans, were in Nelson County where the number of deaths amounted to over one percent of the county’s population. Hurricane Camille caused more than $140 million of damage (1969 dollars) in Virginia. The book, Roar of the Heavens, available for checkout.

November 10, Sesame Street, a children’s show, premiered on the National Education Television network (NET), which later became PBS.

November 13, Speaking in Des Moines, Iowa, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew accused network television news departments of bias and distortion, and urged viewers to lodge complaints.

November 20, A group of 80 Native Americans, all college students, seized Alcatraz Island in the name of “Indians of All Tribes.” The occupation lasted 19 months. They offered $24 in beads and cloth to buy the island, demanded an American Indian Univ., museum and cultural center, and listed reasons why the island was a suitable Indian reservation.

December 4, Fred Hampton, chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party, was shot and killed while asleep in bed during a police raid on his home.

December 14, The Jackson 5 appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show. Michael Jackson was 11.

December 18, Britain’s Parliament abolished the death penalty for murder.

In 1969, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross (d.2004) wrote “On Death and Dying.” The book helped to launch the hospice movement in the US.

In 1969, Marvel Comics introduced Falcon, the first African-American superhero, in an issue of its Captain America comics.

Haze of Hot Dogs @ Library Open House

James Satchell grilled hot dogs for students outside of the Goochland Library using a grill made by Jason Berry, Reynolds student.


Heat, Haze & Hot Dogs…

In a haze of hot dogs, over 300 students, faculty & staff from Reynolds Community College attended the 2019 Library Tailgate Open House events at all three campuses. While they were there, 70+ students made the “Trek to Tutoring” to discover this valuable student support service at both Downtown & Parham campuses. Aside from dining on hot dogs, guests were also invited to download apps for Overdrive, Flipster, Brainfuse & Canvas. Instrumental guitarist Jackson Wright provided cool vibes to entertain us too!

One of the highlights for the Goochland Campus Tailgate was the use of an ornamental grill made by Reynolds student Jason Berry in Michael Vaughan’s Welding 155/Ornamental Welding class.

The best part was seeing YOU, our students, faculty & staff.
Thanks for stopping by!

P.S. Take a peek at the botanical designs displayed by David Pippin’s HRT 268/Advanced Floral Design class here:
https://flic.kr/s/aHsmHgQRvq