Honoring Hispanic Heritage

Tonight, we wrap up National Hispanic American Heritage Month (September 15-October 15), in which we’ve celebrated Hispanic and Latin American culture and honored the contributions of the Latinx community in the US. It is timed to coincide with the dates that many Latin American countries shrugged off the yoke of European colonization and won their independence. It began as Hispanic Heritage Week during the Johnson Administration and was expanded by Ronald Reagan twenty years later – but we don’t have to stop there.

Although the official celebration is drawing to a close, we can still recognize and honor the vibrancy of Hispanic culture through the many resources Reynolds Libraries can offer. Whether you’re looking for facts about Latinx college graduates (Martinez et al.), the verse of poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera, or the real meaning of Cinco de Mayo to share with your kids (Colón García), we have a variety of books, videos, and online resources to help you learn more.

Byrne, Maura et al. “Juan Felipe Herrera, U.S. Poet Laureate: A Resource Guide.” Library of Congress Research Guides, 5 Jun 2020,
https://guides.loc.gov/poet-laureate-juan-felipe-herrera.

Celebrating the 19th Amendment

The Nineteenth Amendment, which granted women the right to vote, was certified by Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby on August 26, 1920. Better known as the Susan B Anthony Amendment, congressional approval and ratification by the requisite 75% of states was the result of over seventy years of active struggle. An amendment allowing women the vote had been introduced in Congress as early as 1878! Although some women had sought equal treatment under the law since Colonial times, the modern organization for women’s suffrage grew out of the Abolition and Temperance movements of the mid-1800s. Many detractors were concerned that women’s suffrage would mean a ban on alcohol and child labor.

Women whose names we know today – Anthony, Lucretia Coffin Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton – were joined by men such as Henry Ward Beecher and Ralph Waldo Emerson in support of equal rights. The Seneca Falls Convention, in July 1848, marked a shift away from the earlier social movements into a focus on women’s right to vote. A further division occurred after the Civil War, when concern about the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment (granting the vote to African American men, including the formerly enslaved) divided supporters into a federal faction led by Anthony and Stanton and Lucy Stone’s state-by-state approach. In 1890, Anthony and Stanton’s group joined forces with Stone’s to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association, with notable members like Clara Barton and Julia Ward Howe.

Although western territories and states were early adopters of woman suffrage, beginning with Wyoming in 1869, the struggle for women’s right to vote gained traction after 1900, as more women were going to college and joining the workforce in white-collar jobs. While Carrie Chapman Catt focused on winning the support of senators and lobbyists, militant strategists like Alice Paul organized marches, rallies, and even hunger strikes to gain national support. After World War I, the 19th Amendment was finally approved by Congress in 1919 and ratified a year later when, on August 18, 1920, Tennessee became the 36th state to sign.

Joint Resolution of Congress proposing a constitutional amendment extending the right of suffrage to women, approved June 4, 1919. Ratified Amendments, 1795-1992; General Records of the United States Government; Record Group 11; National Archives.

Works Cited

Joint Resolution of Congress proposing a constitutional amendment extending the right of suffrage to women, approved June 4, 1919. Ratified Amendments, 1795-1992; General Records of the United States Government; Record Group 11; National Archives. https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=63.

Mintz, Steven. “The passage of the Nineteenth Amendment.” OAH Magazine of History, vol 21, no. 3, 2007, pp. 47-50. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/25162130.

“Woman Suffrage.” Encyclopedia. Issues & Controversies in American History, Infobase, https://icah-infobaselearning-com.ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2443/icahencyarticle.aspx?ID=23336.

Let’s Talk Series

This summer the library started hosting a weekly book club and movie/tv club to discuss all of your favorite books, audiobooks, movies and television series! We are pleased to be able to offer this series again this fall! We cannot wait for you to join us, let us know what you think, give us your recommendations, meet our hosts and make new friends! All students, staff, faculty and public patrons are welcome to REGISTER HERE to reserve their seat today! You may also register by e-mailing us at library@reynolds.edu.

Next up we’ve got…
Let’s Talk Reads: True Crime and Thrillers
Join librarians Elizabeth and Talicia for a nail-biting discussion of all of your favorite true crime books and thrillers!
Wednesday Dec 2nd 5-6PM!
register here!

Let’s Talk Screentime: Mysteries
Abby Kahler and Jackson Wright will be our facilitators for this discussion on our favorite mysteries, with a focus on the movie, Knives Out (2019). Join us for an opportunity to get some recs, make some friends, and most importantly to chat about movies and TV with other fans! We can’t wait to hear all of your favorites! Register to reserve your spot today!
Thursday Nov 19th 6:30-7:30PM
register here!

Upcoming Schedule:

Let’s Talk Reads!

Let’s Talk Screentime

DATE TOPIC DATE TOPIC
Nov 4. No Meeting Th Nov 5
6:30-7:30PM
Parody
focus on Airplane! (1980)
We Nov 11
5-6PM
Indigenous Literature
(In celebration of Indigenous Heritage month!)
Th Nov 12
6:30-7:30PM
Martial Arts Films with a focus on Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)
We Nov 18
5-6PM
“Pulp Fiction” (potboiler mysteries & Harlequin romances) Th Nov. 19
6:30-7:30PM
“Bad Movies”
focus on The Room (2003)

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!

We Dec 2
5-6PM
True Crime and Thrillers Th Dec. 3
6:30-7:30PM
Mystery
focus on Knives Out (2019)
We Dec. 9
5-6PM
American History fiction and non-fiction Th Dec. 10
6:30-7:30pm
Western
focus on Django Unchained (2012)
Past Discussions
– Classic Sci Fi movies/tv, focus on Alien (1979)
– Favorite genres/books/authors, Quarantine reads kick-off
– Disaster movies/tv, focus on Jurassic Park (1993)
– Summer/Beach reads
– Coming of Age movies/tv, focus on Eighth Grade (2018)
– Middle Grade & Young Adult novels
– Rom-com movies/tv, focus on When Harry Met Sally (1989)
– Comics, Manga & Graphic Novels
– Horror movies/tv, focus on Get Out (2017)
– Ghost Stories
– Books vs Movies: Modern Sci Fi, focus on Blade Runner 2049 (2017) & Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968) by Philip K. Dick
– Romance novels and chick lit
– Children’s Movies, focus on An American Tail, 1986
– Action/Adventure Books
– Classics in Suspense (Film), focus on Strangers on a Train, 1951
– Books versus Movies: Stephen King adaptations
– Anime movies/series with Reynolds Anime Club, focus on Howl’s Moving Castle (2004)
– Parody film classics, focus on Airplane! (1980)

Juneteenth

File:Emancipation Day celebration - 1900-06-19.jpg
Juneteenth Emancipation Day Celebration, June 19, 1900, Texas by Mrs. Charles Stephenson (Grace Murray) from The Portal to Texas History Austin History Center, Austin Public Library. This media file is in the public domain in the United States.

On June 19th, 1865, in Galveston, Texas Union Major General Gordon Granger read General Order Number Three to an assembled group of people stating that all slaves were free. This was the news that resulted from Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation from Jan. 1, 1863 as it finally reached all states, and Texas became the very last state to hear of the news.  Within the black community, this announcement sparked an immediate celebration, and was again celebrated the following year. Years later at Booker T. Washington Park in Limestone, Texas the celebrations drew thousands of people in commemoration of this freedom. Black families gathered together that day to commemorate their final notification that slavery had officially ended.

As a result the date of June 19th was known as the blended word, Juneteenth, and celebrations spread throughout Texas and neighboring states. In the 19th century, festivities included the reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, slave stories, prayer, speeches, rodeos, dances, games and lots of food. As populations spread from the southern United States to more urban areas the celebrations continued.  In the 1970’s the popularity of Juneteenth was resurfacing in Texas, and in 1980 it became a state holiday. Celebrations now include many festivities in many states as a celebration of freedom from slavery.

“Juneteenth.” Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition, Feb. 2020, p. 1. EBSCOhost, ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=134522961&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Prather, Patricia Smith. “Juneteenth.” Cobblestone, vol. 18, no. 3, Mar. 1997, p. 17. EBSCOhost, ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=9704025456&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Wynn, Linda T. “Juneteenth.” Freedom Facts & Firsts: 400 Years of the African American Civil Rights Experience, Jan. 2009, p. 26. EBSCOhost, ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=40073964&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Gay Pride Month 2020

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAStonewall Inn (#14) pride weekend 2016 Image taken from Wikimedia Commons. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

“The spirit that emerged outside a Mafia-run bar in 1969 became the pulse of the gay community and inspired not just an annual parade but ways to express gay pride in individual lives.
Stonewall happens every day.”

― Ann Bausum, Stonewall: Breaking Out in the Fight for Gay Rights

June is Gay Pride Month, and this year celebrates the impetus of the Pride movement, the Stonewall Riots of 1969. In recent years, we have witnessed laws passed ensuring marriage and workplace equality for the LGBTQ+ community. These rights were won through years of protest and legal battles – the will to fight for all of these hard-won rights began at the popular NYC hangout The Stonewall bar, which was also the epicenter of the Manhattan Gay and Lesbian community.

The New York City Police department would regularly raid the bar, arresting, or in some cases, brutally assaulting many of the customers. On June 28th 1969, the patrons of the Stonewall decided to fight back, inciting a riot when NYC Police attempted yet another raid. This time the police were met with stiff resistance, and from this uprising was born the Pride Movement, which has been fighting for equality ever since.

To read about the Stonewall Riots, and other stories about early champions of the Gay Rights Movement, start with the resources listed below. When performing your own search, make sure to utilize the filtering menus in the library catalog and library databases. 

Helpful search terms for your research: Gay Pride, LGBTQ+, Stonewall Riots, Marriage Equality

Electronic Resources

The Wedding Heard ‘Round the World: America’s First Gay Marriage by Michael McConnell, Jack Baker, and Gail Langer Karwoski – 2016

https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.ezproxy.vccs.edu:2443/lib/jsrcc/detail.action?docID=4391858

Law and the Gay Rights Story: The Long Search for Equal Justice in a Divided Democracy by Walter Frank – 2014

https://vcc-srl-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/1r9mc31/01VCC_NETWORK_ALMA5158073000004386

VIDEO

After Stonewall: America’s LGBT Movement – 1977

https://vcc-srl-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/anvtfj/01VCC_NETWORK_ALMA5166190510004386

BOOKS

The Stonewall Riots by Laurie Collier Hillstrom – 2016

Available in the Parham Circulating Collection

https://vcc-srl-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/1r9mc31/01VCC_NETWORK_ALMA990025418490204393

The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle by Lillian Faderman

Available in the Parham circulating collection

https://vcc-srl-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/1r9mc31/01VCC_NETWORK_ALMA990023015640204393

Stand By Me: The Forgotten History of Gay Liberation by Jim Downs

Available in the Downtown circulating collection

https://vcc-srl-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/1r9mc31/01VCC_NETWORK_ALMA990023532550204393

June: Loving v. Virginia

In June of 1967, the Lovings won a landmark civil liberties case against the Commonwealth of Virginia’s interracial marriage laws and were the first of many couples to celebrate the downfall of Anti-miscegenation Laws that were in effect across the Southern states. June 12th is the day that we celebrate the accomplishment of one couple in the face of a tyrannical law that opened the gates for a multitude of couples across these United States.

Mildred and Richard Loving

Calhan, Greger. “A Loving Reality for All.” American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU, 14 June 2013, https://www.aclu.org/blog/lgbt-rights/lgbt-relationships/loving-reality-all.

Carrington, Adam M. “Free and Happy Bonds: Loving V. Virginia’s Nineteenth-Century Precedent on Marriage and the Pursuit of Happiness.” Perspectives on Political Science, vol. 45, no. 2, Routledge, 2016, pp. 87–96, doi:10.1080/10457097.2015.1111733.

Gordon-Reed, Annette. Race on Trial : Law and Justice in American History. Oxford University Press, 2002.

Infobase, film distributor, and MacNeil/Lehrer Productions. Mildred Loving and Interracial Marriage. MacNeil/Lehrer Productions, 2008.

YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-qlS_J4Mho&feature=youtu.be. Accessed 27 May 2020.

Black History Month

This month the DTC Library put up a display on Black History Month based entirely on Google’s site that shows the most searched people in the past 15 years.

In honor of Black History Month, Google is celebrating the icons and moments that have been searched more than any others in the United States.

All the images and write-ups about the most searched people were found on this Google site. The books are available for checkout at all campus libraries. Enjoy the video below.

New business & technology database – O’Reilly for Higher Education

Check out our new business & technology database, O’Reilly for Higher Education. This digital collection which replaces the Safari eBooks database, includes more than 38,000 book titles and more than 30,000 hours of video. Topics range from programming to IT networking to project management to graphic design to business strategy to career development. The O’Reilly database provides unlimited access to any resource in its collection. When accessing this database from both on & off campus, you will be prompted to login with your My Reynolds username & password.

The O’Reilly for Higher Education database content includes:

  • eBooks
  • audio books
  • training videos & interactive tutorials
  • case studies
  • code snippets
  • certification preparation materials
  • practice exercises
  • And much more

**An important note for instructors that may have assigned specific titles in the Safari eBook database in past semesters, please be aware that eBook titles once available in the Safari database may not be available in the new O’Reilly database.

To familiarize yourself with the O’Reilly database, check out this helpful user guide or YouTube video. Once logged into the O’Reilly database, you can also check out their Support Center website.

For instructors that are interested in linking to specific O’Reilly resources in their Canvas courses, check out this page.

Changes to Kanopy Video Streaming

Beginning 12/18/2019, the Kanopy video streaming resource now only allows unlimited streaming for the titles that the library has paid an annual license for.  The previous model of unlimited streaming for all titles was not financially sustainable. We are hopeful that the new model still allows easy access to the most highly demanded and requested films used by our faculty, staff, and students in support of the course curriculum.

When you access the Kanopy homepage, all the titles you see in the categories section are videos we currently have licensed and are instantly streamable. Simply click on the title you wish to stream and then click on the play button:

kanopy1

In addition, anyone can submit a purchase request for any title that we don’t currently have licensed.  Submitting a request does not guarantee that we can purchase the title; however, we will try and honor requests based on the needs of the requester and the current library budget.

Requesting a title is easy.  When you encounter a title we currently do not have licensed, fill out the form and click the “Request Access” button:

kanopy2

You will receive a submission confirmation via email. A librarian will follow up with you within 48 hours to update you with the status of your request.

Do not hesitate to Ask Us if you have any questions regarding Kanopy or if you encounter any issues with access and/or streaming.  We are happy that we can continue to provide access to this popular and useful resource!

Reynolds Libraries offer extended hours during exam weeks: Fall 2019

extended-hoursTo help Reynolds students prepare for final exams,  Reynolds Libraries will extend its hours of operation during the last weeks of the semester at the Parham and Downtown campuses.

Extended Hours Schedule:

7:45 am – 10:00 pm          Monday, Dec. 2nd – Thursday, Dec. 5th

7:45 am – 5:00 pm            Friday, Dec, 6th

8:00 am – 2:00 pm            Saturday, Dec. 7th (Downtown Library only)

10:00 am – 4: 00 pm         Saturday, Dec. 7th, (Parham Library only)

7:45 am – 10:00 pm          Monday, Dec. 9th – Thursday, Dec. 12th

7:45 am – 5:00 pm            Friday, Dec. 13rd

We hope the extended hours will provide you a safe and comfortable learning environment and to offer you the research assistance you need for your final exams and papers.

Good luck!