New business & technology database – O’Reilly for Higher Education

Check out our new business & technology database, O’Reilly for Higher Education. This digital collection which replaces the Safari eBooks database, includes more than 38,000 book titles and more than 30,000 hours of video. Topics range from programming to IT networking to project management to graphic design to business strategy to career development. The O’Reilly database provides unlimited access to any resource in its collection. When accessing this database from both on & off campus, you will be prompted to login with your My Reynolds username & password.

The O’Reilly for Higher Education database content includes:

  • eBooks
  • audio books
  • training videos & interactive tutorials
  • case studies
  • code snippets
  • certification preparation materials
  • practice exercises
  • And much more

**An important note for instructors that may have assigned specific titles in the Safari eBook database in past semesters, please be aware that eBook titles once available in the Safari database may not be available in the new O’Reilly database.

To familiarize yourself with the O’Reilly database, check out this helpful user guide or YouTube video. Once logged into the O’Reilly database, you can also check out their Support Center website.

For instructors that are interested in linking to specific O’Reilly resources in their Canvas courses, check out this page.

Introducing Kanopy video streaming!

We are happy to introduce Kanopy video streaming to the Reynolds community!

kanopy2

Kanopy provides  access to one of the most unique collections of films in the world – including award-winning documentaries, training films and theatrical releases – on every topic imaginable. They also have a significant number of art-house and indie films. Total, there are over 26,000 films available.

Kanopy has a user friendly interface that makes browsing and searching for films a breeze — plus Kanopy is compatible with all major browsers.

Like most of our digital databases, Kanopy is available for access both on and off-campus. Just remember that for off campus access, you will be prompted for your VCCS/MyReynolds login credentials. But once you’re in, you can stream any video you wish!

Click here to access Kanopy (it will also be listed as a resource in our A to Z database list).

Happy viewing!

Be a Part (…of Something Bigger)

Alright, cadets, listen up! At this very moment, the library is looking for a group of adventurous students to take part in a brand new focus group about technology on campus and in the library.

Who are we looking for?satellite

First, you have to be a Reynolds student. Secondly, you have to have something to say about technology. Whether you love it or hate it, technology is a part of our world and we use it every day. It makes our lives both more simple, and more frustratingly complicated. And for you, the student, this means that, like it or not, you have to use technology for most of all of your research and classes. So help us help you navigate this complicated world of gadgets and gizmos by telling us what you need. We need your voices, your opinions, your ideas, to shape the future of technology at Reynolds.

(If that didn’t convince you to take part in the group, did I mention there are prizes involved? And yummy treats too!)

We’ll be hosting two sessions next week and you can find the info below:

Monday, Nov. 16th at 11 AM

Parham Road Campus library (Massey building), Room 103-J

Tuesday, Nov 17th at 10AM

Downtown Campus library instruction room, Room 212

Image credit.

New semester, new computers @ Reynolds Library

Not an actual library computer
Not an actual Reynolds Library computer. Promise.

All three Reynolds Campus Libraries installed new computers this summer!

Features include:

  1. Touchscreen—mouse optional
  2. Large 19 inch monitor—bigger work space
  3. All in one units—more space on the desk for YOUR gear
  4. Blistering fast processor—get schoolwork done in record time

All of our workstations still have the tools students need for their research and projects, including

  1. Office 2013
  2. B&W and color printing from every station
  3. Multiple browsers—Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome
  4. Access to expert help from tech specialists and librarians

Feel free to drop by the Downtown, Goochland or Parham Campus Libraries and test drive any of the new machines for yourself.

Image “my lovely new TRS-80 Model 4” from Blake Patterson on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons License.

Apps from the Stacks: Planets

planets on phoneWhere’s the big dipper?

Is that the North Star, a planet…or just a plane?

Would love to identify the constellations, but don’t know where to start?

The Planets is an interactive 3D guide to the sky for aspiring astronomers. Hold your mobile device up to the sky and see the map of the stars and planets. As you turn, the map view turns too.

Planets includes a 2D view, 3D view with constellations, visibility times and rotating images of individual planets.

Download Planets and have a tiny planetarium in your pocket!

Free for iOS and Android.

Snopes for Images: @PicPedant

Pyramids and the Milky Way?

pyramid milky way
Image from @PicPedant

 

No, not really.

How do you know the image you are viewing is a real photograph and not a computer-generated image?

YOU DON’T.

Never fear, the attribution angel is here!

pyramids

@PicPedant takes images found online—often from reblogging sites like BuzzFeed and Tumblr— finds the original author and attributes them.

https://twitter.com/PicPedant

Through the process of finding the original source, he often discovers that the photographs are actually paintings, drawings or Photoshop mashups.

Librarian Jessamyn West explains about how @PicPedant’s work matters in her blog post “Why sourcing photos matters – how misattribution is amplified on the web.”

…as more and more people just presume the search engine and the “hive mind” approach to this sort of thing results in the correct answer, it’s good to have handy counterexamples to explain why we still need human eyeballs even as “everything” is on the web.

http://www.librarian.net/tag/picpedant/

What does that mean for you?

Look and think critically about the images you see online. If that castle on top of a floating rock looks too good to be true, it probably is.

Attribution is important, including creative commons licensed images. Take the time to find the original and give the artist credit.

If you fake it, say it! If you copy it, attribute it! @PicPedant is watching you.

More information

Exposed Interview: Paulo Ordoveza of @PicPedant

http://exposeddc.com/2014/01/28/exposed-interview-paulo-ordoveza-picpedant/

Why sourcing photos matters – how misattribution is amplified on the web

http://www.librarian.net/tag/picpedant/

Article: [citation needed] by jessamyn west in Computers in Libraries. Find the current article through the library’s subscription to Academic Search Complete (citation below).

west, j. (2014). Practical Technology. [citation needed]. Computers In Libraries, 34(4), 25-26.