Copyright and Online Course Material

In this digital age of posting course material on Blackboard, could you be breaking copyright right law and not know it?  In a recent Tech Therapy podcast from the Chronicle of Higher Education, Scott Carlson interviews Bill Shell, Director of Academic Technology and Computing Services at Eastern Michigan University and Warren Arbogast, a technology consultant, about how to make sure professors know their copyrights.  To listen to this podcast, click here

If you are not familiar with any issues related to copyright law and fair use, contact the Reference Desk.  Our librarians are more than happy to explain these issues and answer any questions you may have.  You can also check out our online Copyright Issues guide.

Integrating Library Resources into Your Blackboard Courses

For Faculty:
Check out our online guide, Integrating Library Resources into Your Blackboard Courses, to find out how to create direct links to JSRCC Library’s online: course & subject guides, databases,  full-text articles, and full-text books.  

For more information on creating links to these resources or to schedule a one-on-one consultation, contact Denise Woetzel (email: dwoetzel@reynolds.edu / phone: 523-5325).  The Library will also be offering sessions in the future on integrating library resources into Blackboard through JSRCC’s Professional Development workshops.

Our Reference Librarians will also work with you in finding appropriate online resources to supplement your Blackboard courses.  Contact the Reference Desk for more information (Downtown: 523-5333, Parham: 523-5329).

Create Direct Links to Online Articles from your Blackboard Courses

One convenient option for making reading material available to students through Blackboard is to create persistent or durable links to full-text articles found in the library’s research databases.  Some of the advantages of providing persistent links to articles are:

  • Students do not have to come to the library. They can access articles anytime and anywhere.
  • It familiarizes students with research databases. Linking provides students the opportunity to see and use the database without having the added responsibility of evaluating and choosing the information from the database.
  • The responsibility falls on the database vendor to handle the copyright issues (e.g., to pay the copyright holder when there is a requirement for that to be done). You don’t have to go through the hassle of getting the necessary permissions to: place copyrighted materials in the library’s reserves, photocopy the material, or download the full article on your Bb course site.

 For more information on creating persistent links, check out the online guide, Integrating Library Resources Into Your Blackboard Courses , or contact the Reference Desk.

New Library Instruction Model & Assessment for ENG 111

Starting this semester, library instruction for English 111 classes will include objectives based on ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.  Several instructional packages will be offered or you can customize your own package based on these competencies.  You can review these packages on the Library Instruction online request forms for each campus:

Library Assessment: 
We highly recommend that English 111 students complete an assessment after instruction.  The assessment is available as a Word file or .zip file that can be loaded into your Blackboard course.  For more information, see the Library Assessment for Eng 111 web page.