Celebrating the 19th Amendment

The Nineteenth Amendment, which granted women the right to vote, was certified by Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby on August 26, 1920. Better known as the Susan B Anthony Amendment, congressional approval and ratification by the requisite 75% of states was the result of over seventy years of active struggle. An amendment allowing women the vote had been introduced in Congress as early as 1878! Although some women had sought equal treatment under the law since Colonial times, the modern organization for women’s suffrage grew out of the Abolition and Temperance movements of the mid-1800s. Many detractors were concerned that women’s suffrage would mean a ban on alcohol and child labor.

Women whose names we know today – Anthony, Lucretia Coffin Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton – were joined by men such as Henry Ward Beecher and Ralph Waldo Emerson in support of equal rights. The Seneca Falls Convention, in July 1848, marked a shift away from the earlier social movements into a focus on women’s right to vote. A further division occurred after the Civil War, when concern about the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment (granting the vote to African American men, including the formerly enslaved) divided supporters into a federal faction led by Anthony and Stanton and Lucy Stone’s state-by-state approach. In 1890, Anthony and Stanton’s group joined forces with Stone’s to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association, with notable members like Clara Barton and Julia Ward Howe.

Although western territories and states were early adopters of woman suffrage, beginning with Wyoming in 1869, the struggle for women’s right to vote gained traction after 1900, as more women were going to college and joining the workforce in white-collar jobs. While Carrie Chapman Catt focused on winning the support of senators and lobbyists, militant strategists like Alice Paul organized marches, rallies, and even hunger strikes to gain national support. After World War I, the 19th Amendment was finally approved by Congress in 1919 and ratified a year later when, on August 18, 1920, Tennessee became the 36th state to sign.

Joint Resolution of Congress proposing a constitutional amendment extending the right of suffrage to women, approved June 4, 1919. Ratified Amendments, 1795-1992; General Records of the United States Government; Record Group 11; National Archives.

Works Cited

Joint Resolution of Congress proposing a constitutional amendment extending the right of suffrage to women, approved June 4, 1919. Ratified Amendments, 1795-1992; General Records of the United States Government; Record Group 11; National Archives. https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=63.

Mintz, Steven. “The passage of the Nineteenth Amendment.” OAH Magazine of History, vol 21, no. 3, 2007, pp. 47-50. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/25162130.

“Woman Suffrage.” Encyclopedia. Issues & Controversies in American History, Infobase, https://icah-infobaselearning-com.ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2443/icahencyarticle.aspx?ID=23336.

Juneteenth

File:Emancipation Day celebration - 1900-06-19.jpg
Juneteenth Emancipation Day Celebration, June 19, 1900, Texas by Mrs. Charles Stephenson (Grace Murray) from The Portal to Texas History Austin History Center, Austin Public Library. This media file is in the public domain in the United States.

On June 19th, 1865, in Galveston, Texas Union Major General Gordon Granger read General Order Number Three to an assembled group of people stating that all slaves were free. This was the news that resulted from Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation from Jan. 1, 1863 as it finally reached all states, and Texas became the very last state to hear of the news.  Within the black community, this announcement sparked an immediate celebration, and was again celebrated the following year. Years later at Booker T. Washington Park in Limestone, Texas the celebrations drew thousands of people in commemoration of this freedom. Black families gathered together that day to commemorate their final notification that slavery had officially ended.

As a result the date of June 19th was known as the blended word, Juneteenth, and celebrations spread throughout Texas and neighboring states. In the 19th century, festivities included the reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, slave stories, prayer, speeches, rodeos, dances, games and lots of food. As populations spread from the southern United States to more urban areas the celebrations continued.  In the 1970’s the popularity of Juneteenth was resurfacing in Texas, and in 1980 it became a state holiday. Celebrations now include many festivities in many states as a celebration of freedom from slavery.

“Juneteenth.” Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition, Feb. 2020, p. 1. EBSCOhost, ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=134522961&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Prather, Patricia Smith. “Juneteenth.” Cobblestone, vol. 18, no. 3, Mar. 1997, p. 17. EBSCOhost, ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=9704025456&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Wynn, Linda T. “Juneteenth.” Freedom Facts & Firsts: 400 Years of the African American Civil Rights Experience, Jan. 2009, p. 26. EBSCOhost, ezjsrcc.vccs.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=40073964&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Haze of Hot Dogs @ Library Open House

James Satchell grilled hot dogs for students outside of the Goochland Library using a grill made by Jason Berry, Reynolds student.


Heat, Haze & Hot Dogs…

In a haze of hot dogs, over 300 students, faculty & staff from Reynolds Community College attended the 2019 Library Tailgate Open House events at all three campuses. While they were there, 70+ students made the “Trek to Tutoring” to discover this valuable student support service at both Downtown & Parham campuses. Aside from dining on hot dogs, guests were also invited to download apps for Overdrive, Flipster, Brainfuse & Canvas. Instrumental guitarist Jackson Wright provided cool vibes to entertain us too!

One of the highlights for the Goochland Campus Tailgate was the use of an ornamental grill made by Reynolds student Jason Berry in Michael Vaughan’s Welding 155/Ornamental Welding class.

The best part was seeing YOU, our students, faculty & staff.
Thanks for stopping by!

P.S. Take a peek at the botanical designs displayed by David Pippin’s HRT 268/Advanced Floral Design class here:
https://flic.kr/s/aHsmHgQRvq





Reynolds Student Expo 2019

What Students Get to THINK about in Class

This week over 500 visitors to the Reynolds Libraries got to catch a glimpse into what Reynolds students really get to think about in class!

That’s because the Reynolds Student Expo was on display showcasing 188 student projects from 24 courses & 338 students.

Click here to see what they are really thinking about!

A big “THANK YOU” to the following faculty members for their support:

Anthony Roe Janet  Adams Mike Vaughan
B. T. Pryor Jill Newbauer Piumini Wanigasundera
Carolyn Parrish Karen Layou Rachel Jascizek
Christopher Thomas Karen Neal Shalini Upadhyaya
David Minoza Karin Stretchko Sheryl White
David Pippin Mary Penzer Stephen Sowulewski
Gretchen Mandley Maxie Cannon Sylvia Clay

Student Expo 2019

Congratulations to the following
“People’s Choice” Winners:

DTC (3 way tie):

  • “Life Cycle of a Butterfly” – CHD 120; Student: Joszette Eddy; Instructor: Sheryl White
  • “Diabetes” – Students: Tamika Coleman, Courtney Lund, Sarah Motley, Dominique James, Shannon Ennis and Stephen Ford; Instructor: Jill Newbauer, NSG 200.
  • “Need Sleep?” – Students: Whitney Lewis, Courtney White, Belle Kazikewe, Kaylyn Sullivan, Tamara Turner, Kathleen Cumiskey, Katrina Woodson; Instructor: Jill Newbauer, NSG 200.

GC:

  • “Airplane” – Student: Turner Parrish; Instructor: Mike Vaughan, WEL 155

PRC:

  • “Brain Match” – Student: Aaron Czerniawski; Instructor: Karen Neal,  BIO 102

Your Holiday Reading Just Got a Boost!

blur book close up coffee
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Recently the Chronicle of Higher Education asked scholars what they thought was the most influential book from the past 20 years….

Find their answers in “The New Canon” and get an intellectually stimulating boost for your holiday reading list.

Enjoy the break!

 

 

Smiling Students @Library Open House

Dental assistant class of 2019.msg

Reynolds students made our days this week at the Library Open Houses on each campus. The “Tailgate in the Library” was most remembered because you, our students, came to engage with us and the resources in the Reynolds Libraries. With over 400 students, faculty and staff in attendance, we enjoyed every moment with you. Thanks for taking our survey, playing Library Bingo & cornhole with us, and chatting over hot dogs!

 

Hot Dogs = Happiness in the Library Open House

Hot dogs & pimento cheese sandwiches made a lot of students happy at the 1st ever ‘Tailgate @ Reynolds Libraries’ this week.  440 folks soaked up the atmosphere, smiled & munched away as the thud of cornhole was heard in the background for our library open house event.  A short hunt for online library resources encouraged students, faculty & staff to investigate library databases… & gather up prizes. Some students even found a book! Tailgate photo

Libraries closed on July 3rd & 4th

4th of July

All Reynolds Libraries will be closed on Monday, July 3rd and Tuesday, July 4th, 2017 for Independence Day. Be sure to plan ahead and check out some good books, DVDs, and audiobooks.  Remember: eBooks and databases are available 24/7/365!

On Wednesday, July 5th all campus libraries will be re-open.  Happy 4th of July!

Students Post Dreams, Seek Resume & Employment Tips @Library Open Houses

On Tuesday, September 20th & Wednesday, September 21st—Reynolds Libraries at Parham and Downtown opened their doors to a flurry of activities…

https://www.flickr.com/photos/92485158@N02/29738035921/in/album-72157670823235473/

From the smallest of hopes to the biggest of dreams, Reynolds students added their goals to Post-It Note walls.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/92485158@N02/29738037931/in/album-72157670823235473/

Advice on resumes and employment were in demand as students flocked to the Career Specialists who served as the main attraction.

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A selfie frame helped to break the ice & get students to think about “My Future Self.” See all the great photos here.

kindle-fire

Two lucky students—one from Parham and one from Downtown—actually won Kindle Fire tablets!              *****Goochland Library will give away one more on October 26th to a lucky student who visits between 11-1!!!

open-house-2016-snip