APA Style Changes – Highlights from the new 7th Edition

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The 7th edition of APA’s Publication Manual is now available. As stated on the APA Style blog, “The transition to seventh edition APA Style will not happen overnight. Although the new Publication Manual was released in October 2019, we anticipate that most students and professionals will start using seventh edition style in the spring semester of 2020 or thereafter.” Reynolds Libraries will update its Citation Style: APA LibGuide by the early part of next year. Below are some highlights of the new changes:

 Formatting changes:

  • New guidelines for formatting student papers
  • More options for choosing a font size and style (other than Times New Roman 12) as long as the fonts are legible and widely available
  • One space after sentence period
  • More quotations will be used rather than italicizing words
  • In-text citations – if a source was written by 3 or more authors, you can use et al.

More Citation examples:

  • The new manual includes more citation examples that include classroom material, Intranet sources, and social media such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

eBooks and articles database:

  • Continue to use the DOI # for journal articles that include a DOI #.
  • Journal articles without a DOI # including eBooks, magazine and newspaper articles found in a database should be treated as print works. Do not list the database name or the URL of the publisher’s home page. Only include database information in the reference if the source comes from a database that publishes original, proprietary content, such as UpToDate. For an explanation of this change, click here.

Hyperlinks/URLs:

  • Present both DOIs and URLs as hyperlinks (i.e., beginning with “http:” or “https:” –  https://doi.org/10.1037/ppm0000185).
  • Because a hyperlink leads readers directly to the content, it is no longer necessary to include the words “Retrieved from” or “Accessed from” before a DOI or URL.
  • It is acceptable to use either the default display settings for hyperlinks in your word-processing program (e.g., usually blue font, underlined) or plain text that is not underlined.
  • Leave links live if the work is to be published or read online.

Publisher information:

  • Publisher location is no longer necessary (same as MLA guidelines)

Help Tools:

  • Reynolds Libraries will be ordering the 7th edition of the APA Publication Manual which will be made available at each campus library.
  • APA is planning to develop a tutorial on the 7th edition changes which should be made available sometime in 2020.
  • The APA Style website has been recently updated to include the 7th edition changes – https://apastyle.apa.org/. Check out the information under “Style and Grammar Guidelines” and “Instructional Aids.”
  • APA style questions can be sent via email to StyleExpert@apa.org
  • The Concise Guide to APA Style for Students will be available in December 2019. “This easy-to-use pocket guide is adapted from the seventh edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and is designed specifically for undergraduate writing.”

Canvas 101 for Students

Learn how to get started with Canvas in only 20 minutes!

Register here for one of our many Canvas 101 workshops being offered this summer semester at both the Downtown and Parham Road Campus libraries.

Librarians will cover: Navigating Canvas, participating in discussions, submitting assignments, completing quizzes, checking grades, setting up text message alerts, downloading the Canvas app on your phone and where to find additional help.

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Getting our Nerd on: Highlights from The Innovative Library Classroom

Denise Woetzel and Suzanne Sherry attended and presented at The Innovative Library Classroom (TILC), an annual day long conference held at Radford University which is dedicated to the exploration of innovative practices related to the teaching and learning of information literacy in academic libraries. College and university librarians and teaching faculty gathered from Virginia and from other states as far as California to learn about the latest information literacy initiatives developed and implemented at other academic institutions. Denise and Suzanne gained much insight on various information literacy issues related to pedagogical theories, collaborative initiatives, instructional methods, assessment, emerging technologies, librarians’ roles, and marketing.  Through networking with conference participants, Denise and Suzanne also learned about the many information literacy opportunities and challenges encountered by other academic institutions.

Some session highlights from TILC 2017 included:

Poster Sessions:

Presentations:

Lightning Talks:

Denise, Suzanne and Josh Watson also presented a session at the conference, Library Live! Collaborating towards Heightened Information Literacy & Retention in English Composition Classes. During the session they discussed the development, facilitation and assessment of student-centered information literacy activities in several ENG-111 and 112 class sections and how these “class within a class” Library Live sessions increased student retention, engagement and success. Research activities and deliverables as well as pre and post assessment findings were shared during the session.

If you would like to talk to Denise or Suzanne about the conference or collaborate with them on developing and facilitating information literacy sessions with your classes, you can contact them by email or phone:

Today’s News: Separating Fact from Fiction

This year’s United States presidential election campaign may be remembered for the proliferation of fake, false and misleading news stories especially on social media sites such as Facebook. Viral news hoaxes have been around for many years but 2016 seems to be the year they exploded into the consciousness of the American public. Even typically reliable news sources, whether mainstream or alternative, corporate or nonprofit, rely on particular media frames to select and report news stories based on different notions of newsworthiness. The best thing to do in our contemporary media environment is to read, watch and listen both widely and often, and to be critical of the news sources we share and engage with on social media. To help you in evaluating news stories, Reynolds Libraries has created a guide –  http://libguides.reynolds.edu/fakenews

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From Open Textbooks to Open Pedagogy

Reynolds librarians, Lynn Riggs and Denise Woetzel, recently attended the annual Open Education Conference right here in Richmond. Open education advocates gathered from around the world to learn about the latest research, development, advocacy, design, and other work relating to open education including: tools and technologies supporting open education; collaborations between teaching faculty and librarians in support of open education; models supporting the adoption, use, and sustaining of OER in higher education; and the role of librarians, faculty and students in advocating for, supporting, and sustaining OER adoption and use.

Lynn and Denise attended a wide variety of sessions on everything from open textbook publishing to open pedagogy. Several sessions that got Denise and Lynn most excited and inspired were:

  • Free + Freedom: The Role of Open Pedagogy in the Open Education Movement, presented by Rajiv Jhangiani from Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Vancouver and Robin DeRosa from Plymouth State University, New Hampshire. Professors Jhangiani and DeRosa explained the What, Why and How of open pedagogy. Open education is broader than open textbooks and savings. It is empowering students to make decisions about the courses they are taking as well as developing content for the course that is both meaningful and valuable to the rest of the higher education community. A fitting quote by John W. Gardner referred to during the session – “All too often we are giving young people cut flowers when we should be teaching them how to grow their own plants.” Some open pedagogy examples identified were: students writing and editing wiki articles; a student-created first-year seminar at Plymouth State University where students were also involved in developing the attendance policy and grading policy. Some of the questions posed during the session were: Why have students answer questions when they can write them? What inspires teachers and students to learn, change, care? How can OER be part of a larger mission related to access and empowerment?
  • It’s Not About the Books: Let’s Think About Open Pedagogy, presented by Christie Fierro, Instructional Designer and OER Coordinator at Tacoma Community College. Ms. Fierro defined open pedagogy as student-created content released with an open license which gives value to the world. Some examples of open pedagogy student projects at Tacoma Community College included: a presentation to the local town council on banning plastic bags; a video promoting and discussing the importance of a local food drive; students writing and modifying chapters for open history textbooks; and students collaborating with the library archivist to create a LibGuide on the history of Tacoma Community College.
  • The Faces of OER: Student Reflections on the Z Degree Experience, this panel discussion included business professor, Linda Williams and four students from Tidewater Community College. Professor Williams began the session by asking, “Whose course are you teaching? McGraw-Hill’s or yours?” Several students reflected that the instructors for their Z degree courses were more engaged with the topics that were taught, and that they themselves felt more connected to these classes than to ones using only traditional textbooks. Students reflected that Z degree courses had a richer bank of resources for them to learn from that just one publisher.
  • Establishing Actual Costs of Textbooks Across Curricula: Data from the Virginia Community College System, presented by Jamison Miller, Kim Grewe, and Amanda Carpenter-Horning. The College Board in its Annual Survey of Colleges estimates the cost per year for books and supplies is $1200.00. This group of doctoral students sought to find out how much the average costs for books are for first year students at the VCCS colleges. They compiled a list of college level, general education, first year courses at each school and checked these against the bookstores’ prices at each college. The estimated average cost of books for these two semesters in the VCCS is $1,110.50 which is less than but close to the national average. Estimated costs for a fall semester’s worth of books at Reynolds is just over $600. For a fall semester at Central Virginia Community College the cost is under $100.

Other session highlights included:

If you would like to talk to Lynn or Denise about the Open Education Conference or discuss possible OER collaborations with the library, you can contact them by email or phone:

Check out these other Open Education Conference resources:

Need a resume that stands out?

Don’t miss this chance to give your resume a boost and land your next job! Attend the Resume Rescue! workshops being held at both the Parham Road and Downtown campuses. This workshop will cover:

  • Types of resumeshired
  • Action verbs
  • What to include and not include in your resume
  • How to tailor your resume to a specific job

You will also learn about the many library resources that can help you with preparing your resume.

Workshops will be held:

  • PRC – Thu, Oct. 30th, 11am-12pm, Massey LTC, Library, Room 103J
  • DTC – Wed, Nov. 5th, 10am-11am, Room 212

Librarians share what happened in Vegas

Hong Wu, Library Director, and Denise Woetzel, Reference/Information Literacy Librarian, had the privilege to attend the American Library Association’s (ALA) annual conference this year in Las Vegas. It was a great conference and we would like to share with you some of the highlights and our top picks from the conference:

Highlights:

Looking for Annual Conference session handouts and slides? If they’re available, you’ll find them by using the Scheduler.

Top Picks from Hong and Denise:

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